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Home >  News >  January, 2014

Our 2014 Salary Survey Results Are In

See how your paycheck compares to your colleagues in Outpatient Surgery Magazine's 2014 Salary Survey.

Published: January 8, 2014

Here are a few of the key findings from our 2014 salary survey, which is online now for your perusal.

  • Six-figure club. About one-third of our 533 survey respondents earn $100,000 or more managing a surgical facility.
  • Due for a raise? Half (50.0%) of our hospital respondents and 43.5% of our ASC respondents have gotten a raise within the last year.
  • On the move. Half (50.3%) of our hospital respondents and 37.5% of our ASC respondents say they're "on the lookout" for other employment opportunities. The top 2 factors that would influence their decision to change jobs? More money and less stress.
  • Fairly compensated? Big disparity between hospital and surgical center leaders when we asked if they feel they're fairly compensated. Nearly half (46.7%) of our hospital respondents thought so, compared to about only one-fourth (26.9%) of our ASC respondents.

Dan O'Connor

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