Home E-Weekly April 17, 2018

Identify Theft Charges for Disgraced Former Orthopedic Surgeon

Published: April 17, 2018

Signing Bonus WHO ARE YOU? Former orthopedic surgeon Spyros Panos is accused of stealing the identity of another doctor.

A former orthopedic surgeon who was stripped of his medical license and sentenced to 4 ½ years in prison after an October 2013 conviction in a multimillion dollar healthcare fraud case now faces charges that he impersonated another doctor.

Spyros Panos allegedly collected more than $860,000 by posing as the legitimately licensed orthopedic surgeon — who was once Mr. Panos's medical colleague — so he could perform independent workers' compensation case reviews.

The latest round of charges against Mr. Panos include wire fraud, healthcare fraud and aggravated identity theft. Dr. Panos faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted of all counts.

Officials say Mr. Panos used the other doctor's identity and credentials both before and after being released from prison in 2016. Dr. Panos was convicted in 2013 in an unrelated case in which he admitted to lying for years "about the nature and scope of surgical procedures" he performed in order to fraudulently bill Medicare as well as private insurers inappropriately for millions.

"With jaw-dropping hubris, this disgraced former physician engaged in a health care fraud scheme while serving a federal sentence for yet another healthcare fraud," New York State Workers' Compensation Fraud Inspector General Catherine Leahy Scott says in a statement. She went on to note almost with amazement what she called Mr. Panos's "clear disdain for making an honest living."

Richard Abowitz

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