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Home >  E-Weekly >  May 27, 2014

Some Nasal Bacteria May Help Prevent Infections

Published: May 27, 2014

Patients with a higher percentage of proteobacteria in their noses may be less likely to develop surgical infections, suggesting that it may be possible to design prophylactic procedures that can help prevent skin infections.

In a recent study, researchers who collected nasal samples and cultures from 86 soldiers at Fort Benning, Ga., used DNA sequencing to determine the microbial composition of the samples. They then compared the biodiversity of the bacterial population for those who were colonized and/or infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus(MRSA) or methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) to those who were culture-negative for S. aureus.

Along with finding a significantly higher percentage of proteobacteria in the noses of those who didn't develop infections, they found that S. aureus carriers had a unique nasal microbiome that differed from non-carriers. The researchers believe that this discovery could lead to future prophylactic procedures that can help prevent infections.

Jim Burger

 
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