Home E-Weekly February 4, 2014

Are Outpatient Lap Choles Safe for Seniors?

Published: February 4, 2014

Low post-op complication rates among most elderly laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients prove that outpatient is a safe option for them, according to a recent study.

Researchers at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City combed a surgical outcomes database to evaluate the safety of ambulatory lap choles among the 65-plus set. They reviewed the cases of 15,248 elective patients who underwent the procedure between 2007 and 2010 nationwide, a population evenly divided between those discharged on the day of surgery and those admitted for overnight hospital stays.

Post-op complication rates, including mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and sepsis, were all lower among the ambulatory group than the inpatient group, the researchers reported in the December 2013 issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

"We believe ambulatory [lap choles] are safe in elderly patients as demonstrated by low complication rates," they concluded.

Not surprisingly, they also found that patients with a history of congestive heart failure, ASA class 4 designation, bleeding disorder or renal failure were more likely to require inpatient admission and thus more likely to suffer post-op complications.

David Bernard

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