Archive April 2008 IX, No. 4

6 Patient Positioning Pointers

Experts share tips that can improve patient and staff safety.

Nathan Hall

BIO

What you do in the few minutes you have to position a patient for surgery can have long-lasting consequences. Candy cane leg holders that wrap around the head of the fibula can compress the leg's peroneal nerve. Excessively abducted hips increase strain on the obturator nerve and can cause pain and adductor muscle dysfunction. Hip flexion increases pressure on the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves and can cause painful paresthesias. Here are six positioning pointers to apply at your facility.

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