Second OpinionsNail polish strips

Nail polish strips

The new rage seems to be the adhesive nail polish strips. What are thoughts and/or policies for scrubbing with them on?

Started by: Yvonne Hunter (Other) at April 29, 2019 (9:42 am)

Comments and Responses

 

Our policy is natural nails only for anyone providing direct patient care.
Belinda Lishewski, RN (Compliance Officer) May 2, 2019

Belinda Lishewski (Other) at May 2, 2019 (12:38 pm)

We do not allow nail enhancements in our ASC. We do, however had a scrub tech showing up recently with long false eyelashes! has anyone ever seen this addressed?

K. Bennett (Director, Surgical Services/Director of Nursing) at May 1, 2019 (11:33 am)

I have tried the strips and found that they do chip and lift. They are easily removed with an orange stick meaning they don't bond well. The glitter strips are even worse for coming apart. Definitely not in our facility.
Terry O.

Felinda R. (Administrator/Director/Manager/Owner/Executive Officer) at April 30, 2019 (11:04 am)

Please verify the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBy9Lq3kPKo
If, after observation, there are still doubts, then we are faced with a sophism; safe nails, are natural nails.
Let the fallacious arguments.

M. Valente (Director, Surgical Services/Director of Nursing) at April 30, 2019 (3:20 am)

Does anyone have any research to support the stance to be anti? The newer nail polish strips are just that, polish. They aren"™t stickers, they aren"™t vinyl or anything like that. They adhere to the nail just like polish does and therefore there is not an interface for "something to get under it and grow". I have only found one article studying nail polish and infection risk; and it found that there was no difference between polished and unpolished nails bacterial load after scrubbing. The WHO Reccs no artificial nails, but does not say that nail polish falls into that group. Additionally the Canadian system for infectious disease conducted a study that said unchipped nail polish is not a risk factor for infection. Does anyone have anything (scientific) that states otherwise? A concerned surgeon.....

S C Regan (Medical Director/Chief Surgeon) at April 29, 2019 (8:13 pm)

I would worry if an employee thinks this is ok, for this CLEARLY shows their lack of infection control understanding and may present a risk for patient safety.

Faris Zureikat (Administrator/Director/Manager/Owner/Exec. Officer) at April 29, 2019 (3:39 pm)

These are essentially "stickers" on the nails. I had a pharmacist I fought with about these...until she took them off. She said they left a sticky residue and damaged the surface of her nails. Needless to say, I won that argument. Thank you for bringing this to the surface. Infection Preventionist's everywhere should be grateful!!! Thanks to all the Surgical Services Directors standing in the gap!!!

Ashley Hamlin (Other) at April 29, 2019 (2:59 pm)

Our system wide policy is No Nail Enhancements defined as substances or devices applied or added to the natural nail...

Heidi N. (OR Manager/Supervisor) at April 29, 2019 (2:58 pm)

No, not at our facility

Kathryn Abie (Administrator/Director/Manager/Owner/Executive Officer) at April 29, 2019 (1:08 pm)

Just as with artificial nails, water can seep under and grow yeast, pseudomonas and other water bugs. These are not allowed in to be worn by OR or any other direct patient care staff.

J. Holmes (Other) at April 29, 2019 (12:37 pm)

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